Eucalypts of the Mount Alexander Region

Eucalypts of the Mount Alexander Region by Bernard Slattery, Ern Perkins and Bronwyn Silver is a great new resource.cover-single-page-euc-book This 90 page guide aims to help the beginner train the eye to see the differences between eucalypts. It shows the commonest species of the Mount Alexander Region but describes species common to the whole Box-Ironbark region so is useful in a  wider area. Sections on major species include drawings of buds, fruit, juvenile leaves and adult leaves by Leon Costermans.

The book is a community project of the Friends of the Box-Ironbark Forests. Publication has been made possible by a generous grant from the Worrowing Fund through the Norman Wettenhall Foundation. The Castlemaine Field Naturalists’ Club and Connecting Country have also provided financial support.   link


Canadian (Woowookarung) Regional Park – Monitoring Vegetation Change

Some examples of Photo-Point data  –  recorded in Aug-Sept 2013 & 2016.
See Map of approximate positions of example sites on last slide.
The 5 examples are drawn from 17 sites recorded by the Field Naturalists Club of Ballarat.

Example one – 2016 shows much improved soil cover, with good native herbs and some tree seedlings


Example two – 2016 shows improved soil cover, with good regen of Eucalypts & Blackwood

Example three – 2016 shows heavy invasion of Gorse, English Broom and exotic grasses, with some sedges and Cassinia
Example four: – 2016 shows fair soil cover, with a mixture of weeds (Gorse) and native shrubs (mainly Cassini and a few tree seedlingsSlides4aPPT14LookingSouth.jpg

Example four: 2016 show good soil cover with mainly Cassinia species and a few Eucs
Slide7BriefComments after2016Recording.jpg

Many thanks to Colin Hancock of Ballarat Bushwalking and Outdoor Club for help with photography and GPS work. We were able to return to within 1 metre of the marker pegs at 16 of 17 sites, after 3 years.

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Photo below shows bushwalkers (BBOC) passing through very weed infested area near powerlines in SE Canadian in 2015. Burgan and English Broom seeding heavily.

Walkers in Boome weed invasion Walking through Broome and Burgan Canadian Dec 14.jpg

Lal Lal and Moorabool Falls

If you didn’t make it out to see the Lal Lal Falls in the last week, here are some photos from Friday.  There were lots of people looking at the water today.

Not everyone knows about Moorabool Falls and they are smaller than the Lal Lal Falls but close by.  It is a bit a a walk to get to them, but if you park in the carpark in Harris Road and take the scenic walk you will be rewarded with plenty of views and you may spot a wallaby or two.

Clarkesdale and Field Nats

On 3 September about 30 Ballarat and Geelong Field Nats met up for an excursion to Clarkesdale at Linton. This is a favourite site for birdos and there are always an interesting selection of birds to see. When the ‘bird paddock’ was first planted out many native plants were included that were not local to the area but provided great bird habitat and food.

Spring is here

Probably Sprinter is here if you subscribe to the six season calendar. On a recent trip out to the Enfield Forest Bill M. really felt spring had arrived when he saw  Chiloglottis trapeziformis , Corybas incurvus , Pterostylis concinna , Pterostylis nana and the find of the day was a large colony of Cyanicula caerulea.

Mooney’s Dam

Mooney’s Dam at Smythesdale is a Crown land reserve managed by the Ballarat Environment Network and the last site we visited on our August excursion.

A Beaut View

As the tour of BEN reserves continued we had lunch at the Flagstaff Hill lookout reserve on Mt Bute, where there is a panoramic view 360 degree view.


Flagstaff Hill

Part way up to the Flagstaff Hill lookout tower (just out of Linton) is another BEN reserve. It was a gravel reserve and used to be covered in pine trees. Since the pines have been removed the native vegetation is slowly growing back.

Newtown Recreation Reserve

The first site on the tour of some smaller Ballarat Environment Network Reserves for the August excursion began at the Newtown Recreation Reserve. Since we arrived as most of the group had toured the reserve and surrounding bush, here are only a few photos of the plants. There were masses of coral lichen – Cladina confusa .

Official Announcement of Canadian Regional Park

As Field Nats we have a particular interest in this so RSVP today if you want to attend