Category Archives: Places to visit

More Enfield Flowers

These photos have been supplied by Emily and relate back to our club excursion to Enfield Forest in November.

We look forward to seeing members and visitors tonight for our last club meeting for this year. Members will be sharing a few of their highlights from this year, 7.30 pm at the Fed Uni Campus on the corner of Gillies St and Gregory St Wendouree.

Beacon Hill

Mt Misery Garden

Surface Point

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A day out at Illabarook

Twelve field naturalists gathered in very light precipitation on the Moonlight-Illabarook Road-side next to the Illabarook Rail Reserve on Sunday October 7. The reserve is a 28 hectare crown land reserve, one of more than 50 managed by Ballarat Environment Network since 2005. It was previously the home of the Illabarook Railway Station and goods shed, remnants of which can still be found across the site.

Running Postman

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Rediscovering Ballarat’s Bushland

On our July excursion led by Emily Noble, we visited some of the bushland areas included in Discovering Ballarat’s Bushland*, published by the Club in 2002.

Mt Buninyong in the fog

A group of 11 gathered at the Blackberry Lane car park on a cold morning with low cloud covering Mt Buninyong. We walked past mature Messmate and Manna Gum, some with hollows. As we climbed higher the weedy species grew fewer. The ground cover was mainly Common Tussock-grass and Weeping Grass. Herbs among the grass included Bidgee-widgee, and Prickly Starwort. A variety of fungi were seen. Continue reading

Meandering at Melton Botanic Gardens

The Melton Botanic Gardens have been officially opened since the Ballarat Field Naturalists last visited and another section of path has also been opened to the public. It now possible to do a loop walk across into an area that is yet to be developed. The path goes close to the freeway and is very noisy but gives a different perspective to the gardens.

Lal Lal Reserve

There is still plenty to see at Lal Lal Falls Reserve if you decide you want a walk. There is no water going over the falls but still some in pools in the creek. The kangaroo grass is looking great and gives a light orange tinge. Some patches of native grass have been left un-mown in the public area which I like to see. The Hairy Anchor Plant has already dropped its seed and looks healthy despite its dry position on the bank. The clustered everlastings add a bright colour to the slopes and the scenery is still spectacular.

 

A short walk in Long Forest

Whist 2 car loads of Field Nats visited Trench Reserve last Saturday, two of us went for a 3km walk along Old House Track in Long Forest, near Bacchus Marsh. If you don’t know the site is it the only patch of mallee south of the Great Divide. The mallee is Bull Mallee, Eucalyptus behiana.

There a several walks to choose from and well worth considering. We came across a biological release site for a rust to control Bridal Creeper and it seems to be working well, as many plants were nearly leafless.

Into the Trench

Following the excursion to the Melton Botanic Gardens some members headed off to the Trench Reserve in Bacchus Marsh. It is located in Tramway Lane and is listed as a geological reserve and is highly significant. Here are some photos I took back in May.

 

Looking for Dereel Orchids

Field Nats Bill and Paul, visited several sites at Dereel on Tuesday – the Dereel Stone reserve,  Swanson Road and Bliss Road reserve (east side). Unfortunately there are several gorse plants, some gladiolus and at least one plant of boneseed along the northern section.

There was little out in flower at the Stone reserve, only two wattle species – Acacia paradoxa and A. myrtifolia and leaves and buds of helmet and mayfly orchids.

The other two sites had good flowering examples of two orchid species plus flowers of nodding and trim greenhood orchids.

Sunshine at Linton

While it might have been cold and wet early in the day yesterday, we managed to have lunch in the sunshine at the Linton  Reserve. The Ballarat Field Naturalists have kept an eye on this reserve since Trust for Nature added it to their estate many years ago.

We completed the usual fence check to see what branches had fallen in the recent storms and a chainsaw will be needed next time to remove some branches. We removed a bridal creeper from under a Cherry Ballart and had time to admire the correa and a few wattles in flowers. Over fifty kangaroos seem to be spending a bit of time in the reserve and we also spotted a fox and a wallaby.

 

Blackwood Fungi Excursion

As the fungi season approaches we look forward to where we will be led on an excursion. This year it was back to Blackwood and some of the tracks accessed from the carpark near the Garden of St Erth. Here are a few of the many fungi observed on the day. We thank Carol for this selection.