Category Archives: Field reports

Sunshine at Linton

While it might have been cold and wet early in the day yesterday, we managed to have lunch in the sunshine at the Linton  Reserve. The Ballarat Field Naturalists have kept an eye on this reserve since Trust for Nature added it to their estate many years ago.

We completed the usual fence check to see what branches had fallen in the recent storms and a chainsaw will be needed next time to remove some branches. We removed a bridal creeper from under a Cherry Ballart and had time to admire the correa and a few wattles in flowers. Over fifty kangaroos seem to be spending a bit of time in the reserve and we also spotted a fox and a wallaby.

 

Friends of Canadian Corridor Update

Epacris impressa

Here is the link to the latest Friends of Canadian Corridor update. Our Field Nats Club is a member of this group but you may like to take out individual or family membership as well.

Note that there is a planting day in Woorookarung Regional Park on 13 August and that you need to register if you are interested in taking part. Details are in the update. FoCC July 2017 update

Ghost fungi by night

Here are two photos of the same ghost fungi taken in daylight then at night.  The luminescence is seen at night. On film and in digital cameras the light from the fungus is recorded as green, while our eyes will see the fungus at night as stark white. It does not actually “glow” like a light bulb. Thanks to Carol for the photos. Click on a photo to enlarge and see the luminescence.

Ghostly Fungi

While some say they have seen better years for fungi, there are still a lot to see. Here are some Ghost Fungi from near Mt Egerton. They would be impressive if I took these photos at night, because they glow, but that is not going to happen.

Afternoon light on Canadian Regional Park

panorama of the regeneration area north of Recreation Road

Yesterday afternoon we had a quick visit  into Canadian Regional Park and the common heath is looking beautiful. Don’t forget if you are interested in the latest on what is happening in our newest park come along to the meeting at the Earth Ed Centre, Olympic Ave Mt Clear  at 7pm on Wednesday night. FoCC Woowookarung Regional Park forum

Blackwood Fungi Excursion

As the fungi season approaches we look forward to where we will be led on an excursion. This year it was back to Blackwood and some of the tracks accessed from the carpark near the Garden of St Erth. Here are a few of the many fungi observed on the day. We thank Carol for this selection.

Grass-trees in Canadian Regional Park

Two grass-trees grow in Canadian Regional Park. Austral Grass-tree Xanthorhoea austalis is wide spread in the park with Small Grass-tree Xanthorhoea minor in a few areas. In some areas these two species grow in close proximity.

Austral Grass-trees develop a trunk as they grow where as the Small Grass-tree stem is mainly below ground level.

Other differences

Feature Austral Grass-tree Small Grass-tree
Flower spike Flowering section longer than stem. Flowering section shorter than stem.
Leaf cross-section Diamond shape. Triangular shape.
Leaf colour Blue-green with whitish bloom. Green.
Form Trunk may branch. Several tufts of leaves at ground level.

Xanthorrhoea australis and minor IMG_4227aAustral Grass-tree on left with skirt of dead leaves covering trunk. Small Grass-tree on right with several tufts of leaves.

 

A walk in the sunshine

About thirty people turned up for the walk in the northern end of Canadian Forest today. We enjoyed a stroll through the bush looking at various sites related to the Cremorne Rifle Range and then onto the site with the tree ferns. There were a few fungi to see but not many flowers. We finished the walk which was led by the Friends of the Canadian Corridor, with a cup of tea and some fruit cake. We noticed the colourful heath on the way out of the park.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Bring on the Emperor

This caterpillar was spotted in some bush near Bannockburn recently.

Emperor Gum Moth larvae

A chance inspection

Unfortunately sometimes the only way we get to see a bird close up is when it dies. In this case it was a juvenile Crimson Rosella. The colouring is beautiful.