Blog Archives

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Wider Geelong Flora Lecture 13 March

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Wattle Goat Moth

Wattle Goat Moth

Seen at the end of January on a post in a sheepyard under a Blackwood tree was a Wattle Goat Moth Endoxyla lituratus. This moth only lives for a week and does not feed. The larvae are wood borers and may take several years to complete development.

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Dianella tasmanica fruits

Dianella tasmanica fruits

Seen in the Wombat forest near Korweinguboora in February were these purple fruit on the wide leafed Dianella tasmanica.

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Ruby Bonnets

Ruby Bonnets

It was a surprise to see Ruby Bonnets Mycena viscidocruenta fungi fruiting in February in the Wombat forest. This tiny species has a blood red cap with a dimple in the centre, pale red gills underneath, and a dark red stem to 35mm tall.

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Enteloma rodwayii

An rare green Enteloma rodwayii was seen near the Great Dividing trail near Cairns rd, Korweinguboora in early May. The green conical cap about 35mm wide was supported on a green stem 60mm tall.

Enteloma rodwayii

Enteloma rodwayii

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A shelf fungus, Ganoderma australe

A shelf fungus, Ganoderma australe

This large double shelf fungus Ganoderma australe was seen in the Wombat forest near Korweinguboora in early December. The underneath shelf was 500mm wide. The new pore layer is white and bruises dark brown when scratched.

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Ruby Bonnets

Ruby Bonnets

It was a surprise to see Ruby Bonnets Mycena viscidocruenta fungi fruiting in February in the Wombat forest. This tiny species has a blood red cap with a dimple in the centre, pale red gills underneath, and a dark red stem to 35mm tall.

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Dianella tasmanica fruits

Dianella tasmanica fruits

Seen in the Wombat forest near Korweinguboora in February were these purple fruit on the wide leafed Dianella tasmanica.  Each drupe or fruit is about 16mm in diameter and 20mm long.

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Wattle Goat Moth

Wattle Goat Moth

Seen at the end of January on a post in a sheepyard under a Blackwood tree was a Wattle Goat Moth Endoxyla lituratus. This moth only lives for a week and does not feed. The larvae are wood borers and may take several years to complete development.